Dictionary of Rhythm (english)

John Lamb
John Lamb

“The Dictionary of Rhythm is a fantastic resource for any musician or music educator.
There have been many attempts to create a rhythm dictionary, starting with Ted Reed’s classic
Syncopation for the Modern Drummer. What sets this book apart is that Jack Lima includes the metrical
context. Rhythms, like words, do not stand alone and most have more than one meaning depending on
the context. Jack Lima creates a new and elegant system for understanding not just the rhythm itself
but the context the rhythm lives in. As a performer and an educator, I find the book an inexhaustible resource for new challenges for both me and my students. The way Jack Lima organized the book makes it easy to use and understand. As a music composer, the book gives me a supply of themes and ways to vary them that I might not
think of myself. In this way, he could call it a Thesaurus of Rhythm as well as a Dictionary of Rhythm.”


Transcription from the Institutional Documental Video:

1st. Jack Lima

“So Eduardo, in this final level that you just do, it brings to you the sound of the interval before it happens. In other words, you don´t need to play it and listen to know the interval, you just hear it in your head before it happens, right?”

2nd. Wilson Curia

“It is an unprecedented work, like never before. I doubt that there has ever been anything like it, not only here, but throughout the the entire world. It’s arduous work, and he must have spent a tremendous amount of time bringing it into existence. With respect to rhythm, I do not know of anything better, more perfect than this.
The significance is, with this book, nothing else needs to be done with regard to rhythm, because everything is included. Everything. And it’s so much more than has ever been done through the years, you know? So his book has it all.”

3rd. Julio Munhoz (lines)

DMS holistic approach:
Student’s own time
+ Theoretical understanding
+ Exclusive software DMS
= Fluent and natural musical practice

4th. Jack Lima

“The problems with standard music instruction are both the sense of immediacy and the lack of a logical framework. It is expected that the individual will quickly learn to play an instrument, and it obviously works, but after a while, issues can arise. The student is constrained, limited only to what he/she has learned empirically.

The difference with DMS is precisely the logic it brings to learning. Every new student goes through an assessment – like an X-Ray, to identify precisely what he needs to study, i.e. part of the first section, and so on, part of the second section, the third section, etc., at which point he sees that he is capable of everything, whatever is inherent in the music.

The Rhythm Dictionary brings to light all potential rhythmic possibilities, like a global music map. The composer can choose the time signature before creating a composition, then he chooses the motive (groove), and, obviously, having the motive in hand, he can, now consciously, composes something based on what he had in mind before. It’s intended for everyone from beginners to advanced students with degrees in music.”

5th. Daniel Daibem

“Look, the first thing I see in Jack’s method, not only in the software, but in the method, is the organization he puts forth. Because music is art, ok. Now, creating art is exciting. It is an exact science, like a bridge. If you construct a bridge, and you have one wrong beam in there, it falls.

Just like Jack says, he created a real world map of the possibilities of rhythm. For example, in 4/4 time, or speaking of samba or funk, there are thousands more possibilities of rhythmic figures that exist, right? The ‘tagadaga’, how much you can play with that phrase? And he mapped it all out.

Another thing that struck me when he showed me the software is the issue of response time. As a student, you go through a process of evaluation to see how much you do or don’t know. I’ve seen a chord perception class for example, or even rhythm class, and a guy asks: “What’s this chord? I don’t know. What this chord?”

“Bam! Cmaj7, Bam!, Ab6,” and that’s what he works on software, because music is like that. It’s not in time? You do not have the time to execute a sound? If there’s any doubt, it means that you don’t know. There’s no problem in not knowing, just admit you do not know. “I know. I have to study.” Jack’s software method enables quicker response time — that’s what programs the brain.”

6th. Sergio Mantovaninni

“Definitive Musical System, a name proposing an appropriate theme, is a methodology that makes you reflect, because it has a beginning, middle and an end. In teaching the musical language to a person who is already knowledgable of music, who in principle is musically literate, they enroll in DMS, with the absolute conviction that they will come to dominate the musical language. That’s my impression of Jack Lima DMS.

Jack’s method is very logical, the kind of logic intrinsic in human beings. It evaluates assumptions, major logic, minor logic, and based on the premises, he arrives at a conclusion. I became involved and found he has a great deal of skill and competence in teaching. He starts in a simple way, as if he is talking to a layman, as was my case, and developing the vocabulary, he continues talking about music, all the phrases and lines with a beginning, middle and end, leading you going to conclude that you got on board with the right program to really learn.”


Endorsements

Wilson Curia
“It is an unprecedented work, like never before. I doubt that there has ever been anything like it, not only here, but throughout the the entire world. It’s arduous work, and he must have spent a tremendous amount of time bringing it into existence. With respect to rhythm, I do not know of anything better, more perfect than this.
The significance is, with this book, nothing else needs to be done with regard to rhythm, because everything is included. Everything. And it’s so much more than has ever been done through the years, you know? So his book has it all.”

Paulo Bellinati
“Never music and mathematics have been presented as arts so close. The Dictionary of Rhythm, authored by Jack Lima, impresses with depth as thorough musical figures are organized and divided, subdivided, multiplied, going where no method of music theory never arrived. Students and musicians have the task of sounding the rhythm of their interpretations with the same accuracy of teachings designed here. This work is without a doubt a valuable contribution to the musical world literature.”
Paulo Bellinati (www.bellinati.com)

Mark Walker
Transcription from this video:

“I want to congratulate Jack Lima, for his wonderful book, Dictionary of Rhythm, with seemingly endless possibilities.”

Carlomagno Araya

“Hi, Jack! I want to congratulate you for the fantastic work you have done on your book. Thank you so much for doing it, and thank you so much for giving us this approach to rhythm. It is going to be so helpful for a lot of people. Thank you!”

Gina Knight
“I am enjoying my “Dicionario de Ritmo!” Big THANKS to Jack Lima, the author of this incredible book! Jack has a revolutionary and fresh approach to teaching music theory.
The cool thing is he teaches note values while instilling the up and down beats. (GREAT for drummers!) His dictionary is a product of 20 years of intense research, and is said to be the “Book with the most number of musical rhythms” in the world! You can check out his site here: http://smdjacklima.com.br/ It is in Portuguese, but you can get it translated to English. Jack, you’re a genius! …and your system has helped so many musicians! Keep up the great work!!”


Approval records:

Rank Brasil
Record Approval Date:
February 19, 2013.
Book with more musical rhythms
Record is the multi-instrumentalist Jack Lima, who through unpublished work has more than five quintillion rhythms. A work that took more than two decades to complete was officially recognized by RankBrasil in 2013, becoming an incredible Brazilian record in the music.
This is the ‘Dictionary of Rhythm’, authored by Jack Lima, which is the Book with the largest number of musical rhythms of the country, totaling more than five quintillion possibilities.
Published in August 2011, published by SMD Ltda – ME, the work belongs to the Language School Musical SMD Jack Lima, the city of Monte Alegre do Sul – SP.
According to the achiever , the idea of writing a book of the genre came when he was a child and wanted to find out how many beats there . ” This dictionary is the result of a relentless pursuit of clarity and standardization of time signatures ,” said Jack Lima .
In the dictionary, the musician has the possibility of subdivision into a rhythm, working with all styles of music, such as samba, rock, lambada, salsa, frevo, reggae, jazz, funk, ballad, blues, etc.. “The number of rhythms presented came across a new mathematical progression, dubbed ‘Jackmétrica’ with time signatures using the subdivisions of time, rather than time,” he explains.
According to the achiever, from the work you can choose the time signatures before making a composition, ie, determine what compose even without inspiration: “In my view, music is a language where it is possible to work with the investigative side of language. “
Also – he continues – the work is aimed at different audiences: from the beginner to the professional music savvy. “The dictionary was created with the main goal to present clear and logical explanations for musical styles,” he adds.
World map of music
The musician and radio personality enshrined Daniel Daibem says that the book of Jack Lime is a true map of the world the possibilities of musical rhythms and speaks of the importance of the work: “The exact sciences is like a bridge: if you have a beam wrong it falls” .
For the renowned pianist Wilson Curia, the ‘Dictionary of Rhythm’ is the result of hard work, which resulted in something unprecedented in the world. “Regarding the rhythms, I know nothing better or more perfect”, he says. “With this work, nothing else should be done in the area, because everything that exists is included in it,” he adds.

Elite World Records
India:
The Book with Most Number of Musical Rhythms counted 5 quintillion rhythms was set by Jack Lima of Brazil on August 30, 2011.
Record Approval Date:
Sepptember 14, 2011.

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